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Apartments in Khrushchev Projects Hold 4% in Tbilisi

In 1947-51, the urbanization of the former Soviet Union increased the demand for building compact residential buildings in a short period of time, Colliers International Georgia publishes Statistics.

In 1950, at the congress of architects in Moscow, chaired by the head of the Moscow City Party Committee Khrushchev, it was decided to open the concrete tiles manufacturing factories, which would continuously supply the ready-made concrete panels to the construction process.

After the Second World War Georgian cities were notably displaced. The construction of the factories was aimed at bringing the population from the village to the city thus increasing the employment rate of the country.

From 1956 onwards, the first projects appeared in the name of Khrushchev. New buildings were built with the Method of Remnants. Ready-made materials were shipped to Georgia in order to be applied to the construction process of new buildings.

New buildings were named after Khrushchev though the general model was aimed at standard braking, freight traffic, greenery, sports grounds, flat clear areas for children, schools, kindergartens, medical facilities, which served as a beneficial decision for both the residents and the city planning as well. The 4 and 5-storey projects that were built in the quarters were similar to the model of houses in Europe.

The absence of state quality regulations of that time made the process quick and economical. The construction cycle continued throughout the former Soviet Union until the end of the 80s.

The Khrushchev’s blocks basically consisted of 5 floors with 3 apartments in each entrance. The project did not envisage the installation of the elevator in the buildings while the rooms were smaller and the maximum ceiling height was 2.6 meters.

The facade decoration did not involve plaster and other decorative elements. The easy-to-break Khrushchev buildings were built to temporarily resolve the housing problem and their expiration period was meant for 50 years. The late study found that prolongation of the buildings could be extended up to 150 years, provided timely reinforcement works were carried out.

Gradually the population started to build their own infrastructure settings with buildings such as additional floors and rooms, which led to the disruption of the building blocks and subsequently their outrage. These actions were not restricted by the law.

Today, there are frequent cases where the construction metal belts are fitted to the outside of the buildings. Most of such reinforcement constructions were undertaken by delay, which did not provide for the life cycle and part of the population was forced to leave their houses.

Although Khrushchev’s residential apartments have expired, the Vazha-Pshavela quarters of Tbilisi are found to have preserved the project buildings in a solid form.

There is  508 Khrushchev project buildings in Tbilisi. These blocks are scattered throughout the city, the major part of which is found on Vazha-Pshavela Quarters, Dighomi and Varketili massifs.

The standard volumetric area of a Khrushchev project building is approximately ​​801.85m2 with total of 2.500m2 assigned for the residential area. The entire residential area of the Khrushchev project buildings in Tbilisi is approximately 1.066.800m2.

From 1940 to 1990, the residential area of ​​the Khrushchev project apartments amounted to 8% of the total living space in Tbilisi. As of today this figure is reduced to 4%.

Within the works embarked, the Colliers International Georgia has appraised the total of 1022 Khrushchev project apartments in Georgia with 65% located in Tbilisi. The largest share of Tbilisi-based apartments is 40.4% in Saburtalo followed by Didube with 16.2%, and Varketili with 10.1%.

The price per square meter of the Khrushchev project apartments varies according to the district the facility is located in. For example: the price of a square meter of a residential building in Saburtalo is 688 USD, in Didube – 654 USD, and in Varketili – 474 USD. Varketili is followed with Temka, Samgori and Gldanula settlement, where the price of the Khrushchev project apartments is 454 USD.

  • Construction Period: 1960s of the 20th century
  • Floating Floors: 4/5
  • Ceiling Height : 2.5 -2.65  m
  • Construction Material:  Concrete Panel / Brick
  • Construction method: Remnants
  • Number of Apartments on Each Floor:  3
  • Elevator: No

In 1947-51, the urbanization of the former Soviet Union increased the demand for building compact residential buildings in a short period of time.

In 1950, at the congress of architects in Moscow, chaired by the head of the Moscow City Party Committee Khrushchev, it was decided to open the concrete tiles manufacturing factories, which would continuously supply the ready-made concrete panels to the construction process.

After the Second World War Georgian cities were notably displaced. The construction of the factories was aimed at bringing the population from the village to the city thus increasing the employment rate of the country.

From 1956 onwards, the first projects appeared in the name of Khrushchev. New buildings were built with the Method of Remnants. Ready-made materials were shipped to Georgia in order to be applied to the construction process of new buildings.

New buildings were named after Khrushchev though the general model was aimed at standard braking, freight traffic, greenery, sports grounds, flat clear areas for children, schools, kindergartens, medical facilities, which served as a beneficial decision for both the residents and the city planning as well. The 4 and 5-storey projects that were built in the quarters were similar to the model of houses in Europe.

The absence of state quality regulations of that time made the process quick and economical. The construction cycle continued throughout the former Soviet Union until the end of the 80s.

The Khrushchev’s blocks basically consisted of 5 floors with 3 apartments in each entrance. The project did not envisage the installation of the elevator in the buildings while the rooms were smaller and the maximum ceiling height was 2.6 meters.

The facade decoration did not involve plaster and other decorative elements. The easy-to-break Khrushchev buildings were built to temporarily resolve the housing problem and their expiration period was meant for 50 years. The late study found that prolongation of the buildings could be extended up to 150 years, provided timely reinforcement works were carried out.

Gradually the population started to build their own infrastructure settings with buildings such as additional floors and rooms, which led to the disruption of the building blocks and subsequently their outrage. These actions were not restricted by the law.

Today, there are frequent cases where the construction metal belts are fitted to the outside of the buildings. Most of such reinforcement constructions were undertaken by delay, which did not provide for the life cycle and part of the population was forced to leave their houses.

Although Khrushchev’s residential apartments have expired, the Vazha-Pshavela quarters of Tbilisi are found to have preserved the project buildings in a solid form.

There is  508 Khrushchev project buildings in Tbilisi. These blocks are scattered throughout the city, the major part of which is found on Vazha-Pshavela Quarters, Dighomi and Varketili massifs.

The standard volumetric area of a Khrushchev project building is approximately ​​801.85m2 with total of 2.500m2 assigned for the residential area. The entire residential area of the Khrushchev project buildings in Tbilisi is approximately 1.066.800m2.

From 1940 to 1990, the residential area of ​​the Khrushchev project apartments amounted to 8% of the total living space in Tbilisi. As of today this figure is reduced to 4%.

Within the works embarked, the Colliers International Georgia has appraised the total of 1022 Khrushchev project apartments in Georgia with 65% located in Tbilisi. The largest share of Tbilisi-based apartments is 40.4% in Saburtalo followed by Didube with 16.2%, and Varketili with 10.1%.

The price per square meter of the Khrushchev project apartments varies according to the district the facility is located in. For example: the price of a square meter of a residential building in Saburtalo is 688 USD, in Didube – 654 USD, and in Varketili – 474 USD. Varketili is followed with Temka, Samgori and Gldanula settlement, where the price of the Khrushchev project apartments is 454 USD.